[HKU Assembly Concludes Real Rioters in 2016 Mongkok “Riot” were Hong Kong Police (Chapman Chen reports) — Local Press]

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The 2016 Lunar New Year Mongkok Police-civilian Clash was a defense of Hong Kong local culture, particularly in terms of unlicensed street hawkers being tolerated during the first 3 days of the Lunar New Year, and a resistance against police brutality rather than a riot, as concluded by multiple speakers of a Hong Kong University assembly on February 8 evening, and as shown by a documentary played during the event. Hongkongers were also advised to prepare themselves, e.g., doing physical exercise, absorbing useful knowledge, making good money, for liberating HK when China disintegrated under America’s pressure, and to send greetings cards to the 31 imprisoned dissidents, including a 72-year-old Chan Wo-cheung.
 
Around 300 people joined the assembly called “Restore the Truth; Don’t Forget the Imprisoned Dissidents” and organized by the students’ unions of HKU, Chinese U and HK PolyU outside the HKU Union Building from 8 to 11 pm last night, in memory of the 3rd anniversary of the 2016 Mongkok Clash. Speakers included Wayne Chan Ka Kui (convener of the Students’ Independence Union), Baggio Leung Chung-hang (former localist lawmaker disqualified by the authorities for depicting a “Hong Kong is not China” banner during oath-taking), high school student Tony Chung (Studentlocalism convener), Ernie Chow Shue-fung (former CUHK Student Union President), Au Cheuk-hei (CUHKSU President), Wong Ching-fung (HKUSU President) ), Lam Wing-hang (HKPolyU SU President), Paladin Cheng (veteran separatist), and a couple of released dissidents, e.g, Joe Yeung.

Prof. Joseph Lian, former editor-in-chief of the Hong Kong Economic Journal, pointed out that the force used by the civilians in the Mongkok Clash was minimal in comparison with the 1911 Revolution, the 1776 American Revolution, and the Tong Mou 湯武Revolution (1059 BC). “While the price paid is heavy, the seed is planted and one day it will spout and the activists’ dream will materialize,” Lian remarked while quoting Langston Hughes’s (1951) poem, Montage of a Dream Deferred. Lewis Loud, a HK commetator, asserted that the Mongkok incident broke out as a result of accumulated grievances about Beijing’s refusal to give HK democracy and HK Police brutality during the 2014 Umbrella Revolution. Letters from the jailed were read out towards the end of the assembly. E.g., Lo Kin-man, a photographer sent to jail for 7 years for allegedly throwing plastic bottles at the police from a distance that night, urged Hongkongers to care for their homeland no matter how lousy it might be. During the event, Kitty Lau, Editor of Hong Kong Good News, a pro-CCP media, and a plain-clothes police officer, were discovered secretly video-taping the audience.

 

More Facts about the 2016 Mongkok Police-civilian Clash

 

On 8 Feb. 2016 night, when Hong Kong unlicensed hawkers, following the tradition of the Lunar New Year, sold cooked food like fishball in Mongkok, Kowloon, HK, as part of the HK local culture, they were harassed by food hygiene officers. The HK Indigenous, a localist party headed by Edward Leung & Ray Wong, together with other ordinary citizens, came to shield the hawkers. Defenders of hawkers and the police at first peacefully confronted each other. Edward Leung, as a Legislature by-election candidate, started a election rally to justify the gathering, but suddenly, without sufficient warning, the police attacked the crowd with pepper spray and shields. When the provoked crowd refused to go, they were beaten with batons by the charging police. The crowd then dispersed to nearby streets and engaged in sporadic conflicts with the police. The conflict was escalated when a policeman fired twice at the sky & then pointed it at the crowd. It was only then that more and more protesters threw bricks at the police from a distance. Finally 91 people were arrested at the scene or at home.

 

Political Prosecution

 

Regarding Leung’s sentencing, Lord Chris Pattern, last Governor of Hong Kong, said, “We attempted to reform the Public Order Ordinance in the 1990s and made a number of changes because it was clear that the vague definitions in the legislation are open to abuse and do not conform with United Nations human rights standards….. that the legislation is now being used politically to place extreme sentences on the pan-democrats and other activists.” Fiona Bruce MP, the Chair of the UK Conservative Party Human Rights Commission, said: “Edward’s sentencing … is only one of many examples of the HK government using the law to intimidate the pro-democracy movement and curtail freedom of expression.” (According to that Ordinance, anyone joining an “unlawful assembly” & committing “a breach of the peace” is guilty of “rioting”. An “unlawful assembly” is one in which 3 or more persons act in a disorderly….manner likely or intended to cause any reasonable person to fear there will be a breach of the peace.)

 

Disproportionate Sentencing

The HK Public Order Ordinance was passed by the British Colonial Govt. to deal with HK 1967 rioters. The HK 1967 Riots, encouraged by Beijing & local communists, lasted for 8 months and led to 51 deaths (incl. kids, journalists, & policemen) & 802 injuries. Most of the accused got only 1 to 2 years’ imprisonment. Whereas the Mongkok civil unrest only lasted for 10 hours & led to 125 injuries (mostly protesters) & no deaths. Yet, the accused were severely punished, e.g., Edward Leung was sentenced to 6 years in jail, Lo Kin-man 7 years, and a 72-year-old W.C. Chan 41 months. Three of the other defendants had to flee Hong Kong and hide themselves overseas in exile.

 

[HKU Assembly Concludes Real Rioters in 2016 Mongkok “Riot” were Hong Kong Police (Chapman Chen reports) — Local Press]

 

The 2016 Lunar New Year Mongkok Police-civilian Clash was a defense of Hong Kong local culture, particularly in terms of unlicensed street hawkers being tolerated during the first 3 days of the Lunar New Year, and a resistance against police brutality rather than a riot, as concluded by multiple speakers of a Hong Kong University assembly on February 8 evening, and shown by a documentary played during the event. Around 300 people joined the assembly called “Restore the Truth; Don’t Forget the Imprisoned Dissidents” and organized by the students’ unions of HKU, Chinese U and HK PolyU outside the HKU Union Building from 8 to 11 pm last night, in memory of the 3rd anniversary of the 2016 Mongkok Clash. Speakers included Wayne Chan Ka Kui, convener of the Students’ Independence Union, Baggio Leung Chung-hang (former localist lawmaker disqualified by the authorities for depicting a “Hong Kong is not China” banner during oath-taking), high school student Tony Chung (Studentlocalism convener), Ernie Chow Shue-fung (former CUHK Student Union President), Au Cheuk-hei (CUHKSU President), Wong Ching-fung (HKUSU President) ), Lam Wing-hang (HKPolyU SU President), Paladin Cheng (veteran separatist), and a couple of released dissidents, e.g, Joe Yeung. Hongkongers were also advised to prepare themselves, e.g., doing physical exercise, absorbing useful knowledge, making good money, for China’s disintegration under America’s pressure, and to send greetings cards to the 31 imprisoned dissidents, including a 72-year-old Chan Wo-cheung.

 

Prof. Joseph Lian, former editor-in-chief of the Hong Kong Economic Journal, pointed out that the force used by the civilians in the Mongkok Clash was minimal in comparison with the 1911 Revolution, the 1776 American Revolution, and the Tong Mou 湯武Revolution (1059 BC). “While the price paid is heavy, the seed is planted and one day it will spout and the activists’ dream will materialize,” Lian remarked while quoting Langston Hughes’s (1951) poem, Montage of a Dream Deferred. Letters from the jailed were read out towards the end of the assembly. E.g., Lo Kin-man, a photographer sent to jail for 7 years for allegedly throwing plastic bottles at the police from a distance that night, urged Hongkongers to care for their homeland no matter how lousy it might be. During the event, Kitty Lau, Editor of Hong Kong Good News, a pro-CCP media, and a plain-clothes police officer, were discovered secretly video-taping the audience.

 

More Facts about the 2016 Mongkok Police-civilian Clash

 

On 8 Feb. 2016 night, when Hong Kong unlicensed hawkers, following the tradition of the Lunar New Year, sold cooked food like fishball in Mongkok, Kowloon, HK, as part of the HK local culture, they were harassed by food hygiene officers. The HK Indigenous, a localist party headed by Edward Leung & Ray Wong, together with other ordinary citizens, came to shield the hawkers. Defenders of hawkers and the police at first peacefully confronted each other. Edward Leung, as a Legislature by-election candidate, started a election rally to justify the gathering, but suddenly, without sufficient warning, the police attacked the crowd with pepper spray and shields. When the provoked crowd refused to go, they were beaten with batons by the charging police. The crowd then dispersed to nearby streets and engaged in sporadic conflicts with the police. The conflict was escalated when a policeman fired twice at the sky & then pointed it at the crowd. It was only then that more and more protesters threw bricks at the police from a distance. Finally 91 people were arrested at the scene or at home.

 

Political Prosecution

 

Regarding Leung’s sentencing, Lord Chris Pattern, last Governor of Hong Kong, said, “We attempted to reform the Public Order Ordinance in the 1990s and made a number of changes because it was clear that the vague definitions in the legislation are open to abuse and do not conform with United Nations human rights standards….. that the legislation is now being used politically to place extreme sentences on the pan-democrats and other activists.” Fiona Bruce MP, the Chair of the UK Conservative Party Human Rights Commission, said: “Edward’s sentencing … is only one of many examples of the HK government using the law to intimidate the pro-democracy movement and curtail freedom of expression.” (According to that Ordinance, anyone joining an “unlawful assembly” & committing “a breach of the peace” is guilty of “rioting”. An “unlawful assembly” is one in which 3 or more persons act in a disorderly….manner likely or intended to cause any reasonable person to fear there will be a breach of the peace.)

 

Disproportionate Sentencing

The HK Public Order Ordinance was passed by the British Colonial Govt. to deal with HK 1967 rioters. The HK 1967 Riots, encouraged by Beijing & local communists, lasted for 8 months and led to 51 deaths (incl. kids, journalists, & policemen) & 802 injuries. Most of the accused got only 1 to 2 years’ imprisonment. Whereas the Mongkok civil unrest only lasted for 10 hours & led to 125 injuries (mostly protesters) & no deaths. Yet, the accused were severely punished, e.g., Edward Leung was sentenced to 6 years in jail, Lo Kin-man 7 years, and a 72-year-old W.C. Chan 41 months. Three of the other defendants had to flee Hong Kong and hide themselves overseas in exile.  https://www.localpresshk.com/2019/02/3rdmkclash/

Chapman Chen reports:

 

#HongKongHumanRights #MongkokPoliceCivilianClash #MongkokRioting #FishballRevolution #PublicOrderOrdinance  #ChrisPatten #HongKongIndependence #HongKongPoliticalPrisoners #HongKongDissidents #MongkokRiot


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