Chairman Mao is Greater than Jesus Christ??? (Chapman Chen reports)

Share This:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Today is the birthday of Chair Mao Zedong (December 26, 1893 – September 9, 1976), who, according to Halliday and Chang (2005), caused the death of more than seventy million people, more than Hitler. However, Stanley Ng Chau-pei (1970- ), a Hong Kong pro-Beijing politician and the incumbent President of the HK Federation of Trade Unions, the largest trade union in HK, actually writes on his facebook page, “Today is the 125th anniversary of Chairman Mao’s birthday. Only this should be the Christmas of the Chinese, and the best way to commemorate this date is to learn from Chairman Mao!”

Mao’s Birthday = Christmas?

This post implies that the Chinese should celebrate Chairman Mao’s birthday in place of Jesus Christ’s birthday, echoing the current situation in Communist China, where not only a large number of churches have been demolished and a huge number of Christians persecuted, but Christmas is boycotted and Christmas trees destroyed. For the time being, Hongkongers are still allowed to go to church and celebrate Christmas, though buildings on the harbor front are much less brightly decorated in this year’s Christmas.

Every China Citizen shall Support National Intelligence Work

Article 7 of The National Intelligence Law of the People’s Republic of China (2018) clearly states, “An organization or citizen shall support, assist in and cooperate in national intelligence work in accordance with the law and keep confidential the national intelligence work that it or he knows.”  In December 2018, Shen Chunyao, chairman of the Basic Law Committee and the Legislative Affairs Commission of the National People’s Congress Standing Committee, described China’s constitution as having a mother-son or higher-lower relationship with the Basic Law and claimed that its authority extended to Hong Kong.

Photo credit: RTHK


Share This:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Comments